Rubric Generator

I designed this rubric generator to help English Composition teachers standardize their feedback on student essays and create a helpful visual representation of each student's strengths and weaknesses. I have tried my best to break student writing down into separate categories that range from bigger picture concerns like reading comprehension and overall argumentation to lower-level concerns like sentence clarity and proofreading errors. You will rate each component between the numbers 1 and 5; a score of 1 represents a total lack of proficiency and 5 represents complete mastery. Each rating has a corresponding comment that explains the rating's significance in detail; after you hit "submit", all of these comments will populate a feedback paragraph at the bottom of the rubric. You may also add additional comments via the textbox below, but do so before you hit "submit". When you are ready to print or download your rubric as a pdf, just hit the "print" button. I made sure that the print version of the page only shows the completed rubric and comment paragraph, not the instructor form.

Click the "Synthesis" button if your writing assignment involves more than one source and asks your student to weave the sources' arguments together. Doing so will add an additional item to the rubric.

For technical details, please click over to my Github page.

Misreading: Did you read ALL parts of the article(s) accurately?

Thesis Statement: Does the thesis answer all parts of the prompt and address the “what”, the “how”, and the “why” directly?

Overall Organization: Does your essay follow a distinct and effective organizational pattern? (e.g. a clearly defined introduction with a clear thesis, organized and differentiated body paragraphs, and a conclusion that provides a sense of finality)?

Paragraph Organization: Are your body paragraphs focused, and do they develop one unit of thought as thoroughly as possible?

Topic Sentences: Does each body paragraph have an argumentative, prompt-based topic sentence that connects back to the thesis, and addresses the “what”, the “how”, and the “why” directly?

Analysis: Does the analysis always stay on focused on the argument brought up in the topic sentence? Does it leverage textual evidence carefully and thoroughly? Does it also establish specific implications for each claim made?

Synthesis: For a multisource paper, you need to make sure that you synthesize your authors' perspectives throughout the entire paper and explain the implications of these connections. Did you avoid isolating the authors from one another? Did you explain the connections between the authors' perspectives thoroughly and clearly? Did you address the ideological relationships between your authors clearly and systematically? Did you address the implications of these connections fully and clearly?

Evidence: Do you support each of your claims with specific evidence from the text(s)? Is each piece of evidence the best choice for each of your arguments? Did you introduce the evidence effectively?

Transitions: Do you use effective transitional phrases when you are switching between paragraphs, claims, or authors? Are these transitions clearly worded? Do they avoid repetition? Are they more than just basic, formulaic transitions?

Sentence Clarity: Is each sentence free of grammatical and punctuation errors? Is each word the perfect fit for the context it is used in? Is each sentence worded as clearly and concisely as it could be?

Spelling and Proofreading: Is your paper COMPLETELY free of spelling and proofreading errors?

Comp 101 - Prof. Mcguire

Misreading: Did you read ALL parts of the article(s) accurately?

Thesis Statement: Does the thesis answer all parts of the prompt and address the “what”, the “how”, and the “why” directly?

Overall Organization: Does your essay follow a distinct and effective organizational pattern? (e.g. a clearly defined introduction with a clear thesis, organized and differentiated body paragraphs, and a conclusion that provides a sense of finality)?

Paragraph Organization: Are your body paragraphs focused, and do they develop one unit of thought as thoroughly as possible?

Topic Sentences: Does each body paragraph have an argumentative, prompt-based topic sentence that connects back to the thesis, and addresses the “what”, the “how”, and the “why” directly?

Analysis: Does the analysis always stay on focused on the argument brought up in the topic sentence? Does it leverage textual evidence carefully and thoroughly? Does it also establish specific implications for each claim made?

Synthesis: For a multisource paper, you need to make sure that you synthesize your authors' perspectives throughout the entire paper and explain the implications of these connections. Did you avoid isolating the authors from one another? Did you explain the connections between the authors' perspectives thoroughly and clearly? Did you address the ideological relationships between your authors clearly and systematically? Did you address the implications of these connections fully and clearly?

Evidence: Do you support each of your claims with specific evidence from the text(s)? Is each piece of evidence the best choice for each of your arguments? Did you introduce the evidence effectively?

Transitions: Do you use effective transitional phrases when you are switching between paragraphs, claims, or authors? Are these transitions clearly worded? Do they avoid repetition? Are they more than just basic, formulaic transitions?

Sentence Clarity: Is each sentence free of grammatical and punctuation errors? Is each word the perfect fit for the context it is used in? Is each sentence worded as clearly and concisely as it could be?

Spelling and Proofreading: Is your paper COMPLETELY free of spelling and proofreading errors?

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